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View Full Version : Techniques for toughening shins



Dstokes
Aug 25, 2008, 10:51 AM
I was reading a book called a fighters heart and it discussed a technique for killing the nerves in your shins where you put oil on a bottle and then rub the bottle up and down your shins. Have any of you tried this? would it work for elbows too? I'm just curious.

emperor zombie
Aug 25, 2008, 11:51 PM
no need to do that, kick the bottom of a heavybag where the sand collects using your shin. in about a year or two your shins will be plenty tough. also if you have a sparring partner, kick and let him block. obviously both of these will be done lightly at first. be patient and go slow. killed nerves dont heal back. you will adapt to the bruises and whatnot. no deed to injure yourself.

Crocodile King
Sep 06, 2008, 07:35 AM
Conditioning your shin should be done slowly.
You certainly do not want to kill nerves, but you will get used to some pain.

The conditioning / changes of impact building bone is called "Wolff's Law".

silentassassin
Sep 06, 2008, 08:39 PM
you can kick and elbow trees thats how the do it in thailand

Dave.cyco
Sep 06, 2008, 10:10 PM
I know a guy who used a rolling pin on his shins, just like he was rolling dough. I tried it and I can say it feels good!:rolleyes: Similar to the bottle idea, except no need for oil.

Faceguy
Sep 06, 2008, 10:37 PM
More than likely, I'm not sure how it works but 'body hardening' has been around for a while. All it does is kills the nerve ends in what ever part of your body. My friend used to do this but all he needed was a brick and he would constantly hit himself over and over again with it to kill the nerve ends, progressively hitting himself harder and harder and harder. The monks also do this to EVERYTHING(Nuts included) but the work there way up, first they punch pillows then they punch sand then dirt then rock and so fourth. Hope that helped.

dime
Sep 06, 2008, 10:38 PM
Kicking trees is fine if you live somewhere where the trees are quite soft and rubber like. Just dont go around kicking oak trees.:)
Also think about if you really need to kill the nerves in your shins. You might end up actually damaging the bones, which will be a real pain down the road.

Dave.cyco
Sep 06, 2008, 10:46 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=888JHYfoHfA&NR=1

Whatever you do be careful, and don't turn into this guy.

cheesedog
Sep 07, 2008, 01:09 AM
To clear up some misconceptions about iron body. First, the Thai kickboxers kick BANANA trees, they are much softer than that maple tree in your backyard. Two, properly done, body hardening does not kill your nerve endings. If you kill off nerve endings it will cause health problems later in life. Iron body (and iron hand and all the other parts!) takes YEARS of slow, progressive techniques combined with proper breathing and meditation. Many traditions also use special herbs, diets and other prescriptions, such as a complete cessation of all sexual activity (with others or *ahem* yourself) for long periods of time.

From a strickly external do it yourself point of view:
If you want to toughen your shins and elbows work the heavy bag without pads, for fists do fist pushups on progressively harder surfaces (you want to eventually work up to 1-fist pushups on concrete) and for thighs and body take very easy controlled strikes that gradually build up over time. There are other more esoteric internal practices, but they are definetly not "do it yourself" kinds of things.

Cheeze_Baron
Sep 07, 2008, 05:39 AM
Dave.Cyco this vid should explain why the kickers leg broke the way it did.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fe4GURiFFss&fmt=18

With body conditioning all that really occurs is the desensitization of stimulus, allowing someone to get used to the jarring shock to the body when getting hit and hitting back. The blows are to get you to repeatedly contract the area of force(where you get hit) to decrease pain and damage(like medicine ball drops to the abs that force you to contract those muscles in the same way if someone where to punch you there). This also works via wolfs law where adaption occurs to strengthen the bones, tiny fractures happen and it gets built up even stronger when it repairs, like weight training does to muscles. Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming believes the tensing lessens the force of the blow and stops the pain signal from reaching the brain. The "internal" training and meditation likely trains the person to actively ignore the pain, sort of like when you need to go to the bathroom and you get distracted then when you remember your like "oh shit i need to go asap!" yet a few seconds ago when you where "distracted" it didn't bother you so much. This is reffered to as mental resistance and can be applied to grappling like it is in small-circle jujitsu. To get the effect of wolfs law you can do your kicking drills on the heavy bag and do "light" striking of the shin area with a sock filled w/ something like grains and dried beans, then progress upwards to harder stuff like sand and small gravel type rocks even weight training has an effect on bone density. Or use this band training drilll presented in this vid. Take this post like most info w/ a grain of salt(im no expert/nor am i capable of kicking jack).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOao_e_OB58&fmt=18

Journeyman
Sep 07, 2008, 09:41 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ffs_5DMJLw

Sorry I had to.
Everyone should try this! lol

Oh and this isn't just for shins, there are some other very helpful training methods in here too.

Raja
Sep 09, 2008, 02:35 AM
Do NOT hit or rub your shins with any hard item! These can cause small cracks in the shin and can cause them to break along those lines if you kick hard. Best thing to do is to hit thai pads or a lightly padded heavy bag(not at the bottom where the sand collects).

Journeyman
Sep 09, 2008, 02:05 PM
Anyone heard of Danny 'hard as' Steele?

His shins were tougher than a shaolin monk's.

Jared
Sep 15, 2008, 03:23 AM
Hey, i've actually got a Heavybag specifically designed for Shin hardening...
i got it second hand off my MMA trainer for $30 AUS, a great deal, it weighs 50 kilos, and is the hardest heavybag ive felt, it's filled with shredded up tyre rubber.

USMC machine
Sep 16, 2008, 12:59 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ffs_5DMJLw

Sorry I had to.
Everyone should try this! lol

Oh and this isn't just for shins, there are some other very helpful training methods in here too.

insanity. :twisted: